Wednesday, September 25, 2013

BITE ME


A simple question posed over on the book of faces last night, caused a small flurry.

refer to picture:
The questions was: What are those little vinyl bits called? 
There we entered the hook/ loop , loop/toggle, frog debate.
I was opting for saying "Sew the vinyl doo-dad over the end of your cord to cover up the mess" but that's a bit unprofessional.
The debate ran hot but I think most agreed that the wooden bits are the toggles and the cordy bits are the loops. The vinyl bits could be called tabs. The frogs confused me.
The snarkily emailed suggestion that I have no place writing sewing patterns if I don't have a grasp of technical terminology briefly played into one of those deep dark "You are a fraud" kind of fears. 
 My two-word email response was also unprofessional.



62 comments:

  1. One thing for sure, We all are passionate about what we do, Do not give a hoot to negativity, embrace the positivity. More power to you girl!

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  2. Ha! Take that, snarky know-it-all.

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  3. I love that you would give a two word reply :) xx

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  4. I love that you would give a two word reply :) xx

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  5. Do what you love, love what you do, dont give a hoot .. Do You??
    Thank for always being so generous and sharing, negative people can get nicked or any two word response that might be appropriate

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  6. Oh how I needed a laugh like that this morning. Nearly choked on my cup of tea. Tell it how it is anyway you feel the need, but I am sure they got the message in those two words.

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  7. Hang on, someone emailed you that? Geez, we're supposed to know everything, arent we? Well, for future reference, i'll pass on my learning of yesterday- the stiff bit of velcro is male, and the soft bit is female. Cos apparently only Amy Butler needs you to know that, but it's somehow important. 'Soft' and 'stiff' wouldve worked for me!

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    1. I thought it was Hook and Loop? Male and female sounds like plumbing fittings.

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    2. yes, and apparently we are all wrong calling it Velcro which is a brand name that even the Velcro company don't like us using...they prefer hook and loop. Whatever. I think calling it a doo dad would be perfectly clear.

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  8. never thought of tabs......

    It was a legitimate question, I wouldn't know, I don't "do" clothes

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  9. Brave of you to ask. I would have probably made up some sort of word ending in "-y thing a me bob". I think your response was appropriate in both its tone ans brevity. Well done you.

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  10. Go Jodi, so proud of you and your vocabulary!! There are some blinkin pious Pete's out there aren't there, I most certainly would have told them to most probably unpoliteley get stuffed also!!

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  11. A big 2 word reply to them for me too!

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  12. I would just ignore them. How rude of them!

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  13. Some people are rude, not you, the 2 word response is entirely justified. I think tabs is a good one.

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  14. it's your pattern - call the bits what you like :)

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  15. Hahaha love it!! Who really cares what they they are called, life's too short to worry about things like that!

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  16. I would of probably sent a 2 word reply also along with a pic of kiss my ........

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  17. You could also look here http://www.hydbutton.com/product.php?id=342 it may clear up some dilemas.

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  18. lol at your "two word unprofessional response". :D

    Here in Canada, a "frog" closure is this http://www.sewbizfabrics.com/FC1.shtml
    and what you have there is a toggle button with loop. But feel free to call 'em whatever you like! :p

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  19. Is it called a "patch" as in covering up something?

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  20. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  21. Snigger snort! Go Jod - call 'em whatever you like. We stitchers can interpret non-techy lingo; we're clever like that.

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  22. Considering thingamebobs, dodads, wazzits and that are all legitimate in describing the indescribable, who will care? As long as the pattern is followable, it's all good, isn't it.
    Big two words from here, and I doubt I would have been as polite as you. I may have taken more words also.

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  23. I wouldn't know what they were called either --- I think do dads, vinyl bits. or tabs or cord covers all work as do lots of the other suggestions. I can't believe some one was awful to you for asking. We should all be able to help support and encourage each other. None of us knows it all and if we think we do we will never know half as much as we could. I would rather be on a journey of learning and sharing than alone knowing thinking I know it all.

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  24. I don't know, "Thank You" sounds quit appropriate. ;-)

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  25. Well done, my girl, well done!

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  26. Two words - non professional answers rock girl!

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  27. In Dutch those are called 'houtje-touwtje' that is stick-string. Not a big help to you, but funny.
    After this I will remember them as the f-y closure. It fits too. :)
    It is your pattern and it will be great how ever you call them.

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  28. wow, some people. Go Jodie!

    there's two words for you ;-)

    Dingsbums is German for whatchamacallit. very useful word.

    as long as it's clear which bit goes where, who cares what you call it. jargon tends to only be understood by those in a specialist field, so even if you called it (any it) by the utterly traditional historically correct and internationally ratified term, most people would probably need a glossary.

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  29. As it seems no-one knows just what those leather/vinyl bits are called, where does that leave you? Might have been more helpful if the know-it-all person told you the name!

    I made my son a couple of coats with toggles like these when he was small. From memory the patterns I used just said something like "cut pieces of leather to cover the ends of the cords". I traced a plectrum to create the shape I wanted, so I referred to them as "leather plectrums". Sorry that is no help!

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  30. I understand your description (good clear technical writing!) so ignore any nay-sayers (who are probably just jealous of how well you can create things and share them with other people). Smirked over the idea of what your two word answer might well have been.....!

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  31. I think the emailer was jealous.
    Sandy in the UK

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  32. Funny -- love Star of East's comment about always calling them f-u closures. Giggle. Too bad you couldn't reply with hand gestures to go with your two word reply.

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  33. You could draw a little pattern template and call it "Piece A" or whatever, as in "Place Piece A over the ends of the cords to anchor." Or some such. Know-it-alls create such trash in the emotional landscape, like litterbugs, for others to clean up. So unnecessary!

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  34. that is just toooo funny! and a perfect response!

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  35. Ha ha haaa - I love it! And have no fear, you are definitely no fraud xxx

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  36. Ha ha haaa - I love it! And have no fear, you are definitely no fraud xxx

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  37. What does it matter what it is called? If you want to spend all of your time arguing over tech stuff then you never get to make something fun!
    Tell them to go "toggle" themselves!

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  38. Looks like he's warm in his coat. Doesn't matter what the bits are called we can see from the picture what it will look like.
    Enjoy your writing (even the non technical bit)

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  39. That's why we love you! Say it like it is, the rest of us understand doodads!

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  40. That's why we love you! Say it like it is, the rest of us understand doodads!

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  41. I've been experimenting with some low tech emojis recently. I feel that this might be appropriate for said emailer:



    It denotes the hand gesture used at Ajincourt.

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  42. Ahem (see 'origins') http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V_sign

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  43. Haha. I wholeheartedly approve the two-word reply. Cheers to you!

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  44. Your response was no more unprofessional that that nasty little comment that prompted it, and yours was a human reaction to being attacked. Whoever said it could just as easily have written a note in a polite tone that conveyed the same information.

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  45. lol, i hope you told the witch to 'bite me'! ;p you're not a fraud. you're a creative spirit that makes reading blogs lots of fun! ;p

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  46. I hope the emailer at least had some advice as to what to call the dooziwatsit. Who are they to criticise? Do they make patterns with all the proper terms and stuff?

    The whole point of pattern making is to be able to instruct someone how to make the same item that you just made. If that happens, then you have done your job. If you do it with all the fancy words and the pattern user also learns some fancy new tricks, then that is a bonus. Keep doing what you are doing, Jodie. I love that your instructions are entertainment in themselves - makes the whole process fun!

    It's not like any of the big commercial pattern companies would use the proper term either. They wouldn't give it any sort of name at all, probably, just a dodgy diagram that is oriented in the wrong direction.

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  47. I just had visions of you saying that two word response. AWESOME!!

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  48. Good for you! The two words that came to my mind were something else but yours works just as well!

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  49. Yeh go the unprofessional response.

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  50. Do you have a pair of undies with the two-word response embroidered on them?
    Then you could have just emailed a photo and saved the effort of typing.

    Loving that new pattern and am itching to make a red coat.
    Or maybe I'll go buy a new pair of Bonds and embroider 'Bite Me' on the bum.

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  51. Proud of you Jod, never waste good words on idiots! Two words would have done the job beautifully...
    p.s. Italy is amazing!!!!!!
    xxx

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  52. People are outrageous! But because this made me immediately want to know the answer I too googled it. Interesting that all the button wholesalers don't give it a name. That made me think it doesn't have a description at all. I'd love to know what you undiplomatic emailer thought it was called! Anyway - the only thing I found referred to a patch. So I think an eff patch would be a great name.

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  53. Oh dear, some people are so rude! I well remember a girl in my first form in high school. She was not an academic achiever -- in fact, she was old enough to leave school at the end of that year (the rest of us were only twelve going on thirteen). She was absolutely brilliant at hair styling but I doubt she would have made it through tech (as it was called then). My point is, you don't have to be brilliant with the technical terms to be brilliant at what you do! I teach knitting but still resort to YouTube for technique tips every now and then! PS good luck with your return to that place that pays you so you can continue doing what you are so good at doing. I was going to finish one word short of the end of that sentence but, as an ESOL teacher, I know I technically shouldn't end a sentence with a preposition! ;-)

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  54. Really??? Who says that, let alone emails that??? Love the sound of that 2 word reply, very appropriate given the circumstances. The world is a better place for having your patterns.

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Hellloooooo !!!!